Training for writing SWMS

Training for writing SWMS

Easy HR offer a short course aimed at assisting managers, builders, subcontractors write Safe Work Method Statements (also known as SWMS). See course schedule

A Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) is developed by the employer for their employees or by a sub-contractor for work that they are performing. It details how specific risks in the workplace will be managed. The Safe Work Method Statement is usually developed in conjunction with a Job Safety Analysis (JSA).

No matter what industry you are in, Safe Work Method Statements should be used as part of your risk control strategy.

Course Content:

•  Risk Management principles

•  OH&S Legislation pertaining to Safe Work Method Statements

•  Overview of the different Safe Work Method Statement formats

•  Writing Safe Work Method Statements

•  Reviewing Safe Work Method Statements

•  Checking Safe Work Method Statements for compliance

AUSTRALIAN FEDERATION of EMPLOYERS and INDUSTRIES offers a course that enables participants to develop and write safe work method statements (SWMS). See more details

Designed For

Principal contractors, sub-contractors and workplace (construction) safety officers.

Content

The topics covered in this course include:

  • Key components of SWMS
  • General guidelines for preparing SWMS
  • OHS risk management
  • Consultation requirements for preparing SWMS
  • Establishing relationships between SWMS, OHS risk management, consultation and tool box meetings.

MASTER PLUMBERS ASSOCIATION has developed a (6) hour training course specifically for plumbers who need to write Safe Work Method Statements and want help to comply with the regulations. More details

During the course plumbers are given specialized tools to make the job of writing Safe Work Method Statements easier. Once you have completed this course, you will have demonstrated you;

· can conduct a workplace safety risk assessment

· can develop a Hazard Profile

· know how to write a Safe Work Method Statement

· know how to consult with your staff

· understand WorkCover NSW Codes of Practice

· can write a Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS)

· understand Safe Work Instructions (SWI)

· know when to consult with your staff.

PEOPLE SAFE offer a half day on site training course aimed at assisting builders and subcontractors write Safe Work Method Statements (also known as SWMS). All course participants are provided with a blank Safe Work Method Statement format (that complies with clause 224 of the NSW OH&S Regulation 2001) that can be used as a foundation to develop their own Safe Work Method Statement. The course is presented in a workshop style format. More details

Course outline:
– Risk Management principles
– OH&S Legislation pertaining to Safe Work Method Statements
– Overview of the different Safe Work Method Statement formats
– Writing Safe Work Method Statements
– Reviewing Safe Work Method Statements
– Checking Safe Work Method Statements for compliance

Who should attend this course?
This course is designed for anyone who needs to write, review or check Safe Work Method Statements for compliance.

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Barry Spud

Barry Spud

Safety Crusader, Zero Harm Zealot and Compliance Controller at Everything Safety
Barry Spud

Latest posts by Barry Spud (see all)

Barry Spud
What is a Safety Spud? Lets look at a few more spud head activities in risk and safety: 1. Coming on to site saying there is a safety issue when in fact there’s no such thing, it’s a political issue. 2. ‘Falling apart’ when people make choices that we think are stupid because they won’t do as we ‘tell’ them. Then we put on the angry face and think that overpowering others creates ownership. 3. Putting on the zero harm face, presenting statistics, knowing it has nothing to do with culture, risk or safety. 4. Putting on the superman (hazardman) suit and pretending to be the saviour of everything, this is good spud head cynic stuff. 5. Thinking that everyone else is a spud head except me. 6. Thinking there’s such a thing as ‘common’ sense and using such mythology to blame and label others. 7. Accepting safety policies and processes that dehumanize others. 8. Blaming, ego-seeking, grandstanding and territory protecting behind the mask of safety. 9. Thinking that risk and safety is simple when in fact it is a wicked problem. Denying complexity and putting your spud head in the sand. 10. Continually repeating the nonsense language and discourse of risk aversion that misdirect people about risk, safety, learning and imagination.

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