Journey Safety Procedures and Risk Management Plans

by Dave Collins on November 22, 2014

in Road Safety,Safety Management Plan,Safety Procedures



Journey Safety Procedures and Risk Management Plans

Not sure what has happened out there to prompt the number of inquiries we are getting about travel safety plans, journey risk management, Trip Management Plans and safe driving hours for workers driving out to mines and remote sites. In response, below is a great example of a procedure covering all these issues.

Another useful resources is this Guideline published by BP: I Have an STD: Telling Him (or Her) the Right Way (0 downloads)

Arrow Energy have also made available their “Journey Management and Driver Safety Procedure” – download here

“The purpose of this document is to reduce the number and frequency of road travel related incidents and to improve safety performance by detailing the controls required to minimise the risk to Arrow Energy employees travelling by road. Also its intent is to reduce the potential harm to members of the public and the environment. It will also prevent the additional burden of increased cost to the company.” –  – download here

Example Journey Safety and Risk Management Procedure and Plans:

1. PURPOSE

The purpose of this guideline is to specify the requirements for light / heavy vehicle driver hour’s requirements within Company.

2. SCOPE

This guideline applies to tasks involving driving a Company owned or operated light or heavy vehicle for a prolonged period (2 to 12 hours), with particular reference to associated driving hours. This guideline applies to all Company employees and other persons undertaking prolonged driving activities on behalf of Company.

3. PROCEDURE

3.1 Light Vehicles: (A vehicle with a gross vehicle mass less than 8 tonnes and / or seating capacity of up to eleven people including the driver)

3.1.1 Company employees shall not be permitted to drive for more than ten (10) hours in any twenty-four (24) hour period.

3.1.2 Employees shall not be permitted to drive for prolonged periods (2 to 10 hours) where the period of driving and working would exceed ten (10) hours in that working day or in a twenty-four (24) hour period.

3.2 Heavy Vehicles: (A vehicle with two or more axles with a gross vehicle mass greater than 8 tonnes)

 

Company employees who are tasked as drivers of heavy vehicles (as detailed above) shall comply with the table below for required standard driving hours including any other related tasks to the operation of the heavy vehicle.

Company Standard Hours: Heavy Vehicles

In any period of…….. Maximum DRIVE / WORK Minimum REST
5 Hours 30 Minutes 5 Hours 30 minutes, either as one continuous period or as two periods of 15 consecutive minutes each
24 Hours*(See Note 1) 14 Hours(maximum 12 hours driving) 10 hours, including one periodof 6 consecutive hours**(see note 2)
168 Hours(7 Days) 72 Hours 96 hours, including one periodof 24 consecutive hours***(see note 3)

Note 1. For enforcement purposes the 24 hour period means any period of 24 hours but is usually taken as the 24 hours up to the time of the interception. It does not necessarily mean midnight to midnight.

 

Note 2. Continuous rest period must be taken away from the vehicle unless the vehicle is fitted with an approved sleeper berth.

 

Note 3. Rest periods of 24 hours or more must be taken away from the vehicle.

GUIDELINES

The attached “Driving Hours Guidelines” and statement on “Driver Fatigue” published by the Australian Road research Board provide comprehensive information on the procedures to be followed when driving on official Company business and are to be read in conjunction with this policy.

3.3 Driving Hours Guidelines

These Guidelines are part of the Company Health, Safety, Environment & Community Management System and reflect Company’s commitment to the health and safety of employees. The Guidelines specify driving and duty hours to promote safe work practice.

Research has indicated that up to 25% of road accidents are the result of drivers being tired or falling asleep. These Guidelines specify procedures to minimise the chances of motor vehicle accidents resulting from fatigue and drivers falling asleep.

3.3.0 General Principles

3.3.1 Safe driving practices should be actively encouraged at all times.

3.3.2 Staff should apply risk management principles to potential fatigue related driving risks.

3.3.3 The taking of regular and adequate rest breaks (e.g. 10 minutes rest break every 2 hours) during a long motor vehicle journey is of fundamental importance in avoiding driver fatigue.

3.3.4 The distance which can be reasonably covered during a day of driving will be governed by the type of vehicle that is used, the type of terrain involved, the road, weather and traffic conditions, the prevailing speed limits and the maximum time that should be spent driving (see Section 3).

3.3.5 Any driver who feels fatigued should stop as soon as practicable and take an adequate rest break. This may mean 20 minutes away from the vehicle or a night of sleep, depending on the time of day and the preceding period of driving.

3.3.6 In planning journeys involving a period of driving, an employee and the supervisor authorising such travel shall take the following considerations into account:

  • how long an employee will have been on duty prior to commencing driving and of the duration of any work duties at the end of the journey;
  • the time at which the journey is to be undertaken, the duration of the journey and the distance to be covered. The timing of the journey should not interrupt normal sleep patterns wherever practicable;
  • the provision of adequate rest breaks before, during and after the journey;
  • the avoidance of any unusual accident risks during the journey; (eg frost, fire, flood, cyclone);
  • any need for the employees to perform other duties immediately after the journey; (This may require limitation of the duration of the journey.); and
  • the possibility of more than one driver travelling in the vehicle to share the driving on long journeys or journeys undertaken in isolated areas or under hazardous environmental conditions. (See attached Trip / Journey Plan)

3.4 Specific Practices and Procedures

The following practices and procedures shall be complied with as far as practicable:

3.4.1 No more than 10 hours of driving, including rest breaks, in a period of 24 hours should be undertaken for light vehicle operation, for heavy vehicles see the table in section 4.2 of the Company Safe Driving Procedure. In circumstances where two or more employees share the driving, the total time spent travelling, inclusive of rest breaks, should not exceed ten hours per person in any twenty-four hour period.

3.4.2 When driving alone an employee should take a rest period of at least ten minutes on completion of each two-hour period of continuous driving. Where staff members are sharing the driving, a change of driver should take place at least every two hours.

3.4.3 An employee who has been the sole driver of a vehicle for three consecutive days should ensure that the fourth day is a non-driving day. A day of driving is defined as the maximum hours as outlined in section 3 of these guidelines. Where work commitments include driving on consecutive days an employee should attempt to structure their program so each day includes non-driving activities.

3.4.4 The combination of work time and driving duty should not exceed ten hours in any period of twenty-four hours (Light Vehicles).

3.4.5 Employees are responsible for ensuring their own fitness to drive before commencing or continuing a journey. Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is not permitted in accordance with the Company Fit for Work procedure. Employees must not drive if their capacity to do so safely is impaired by illness, injury, and medication causing drowsiness, fatigue, or any other cause.

3.4.6 Where an employee drives one hour or more to or from their place of residence to attend work, and then perform a task which involves driving a light or heavy vehicle for a prolonged period, such time shall count as travelling time when observing any of the above procedures.

3.5 Responsibilities of Drivers

Employees who drive in the course of their Company duties have a responsibility to be familiar with and observe Company policies and procedures concerning the driving and servicing of vehicles and the reporting of accidents.

NOTE: Drivers should familiarise themselves with the vehicle assigned to them before commencing a journey. It is important that each driver read the notes in the vehicle folder.

4. IMPLEMENTATION

This policy is effective immediately on date of issue.

Regional managers and supervisors shall be responsible for implementing the policy in the areas under their control.

In authorising travel for a Company employee where a period of prolonged driving is involved, the supervisor shall ensure that the driving and accommodation requirements comply with this procedure and accompanying guidelines.

5. REFERENCE DOCUMENTS

Australian Road Research Board – “Driver Fatigue”

Australian Road Research Board – “Driving Hours Guidelines”

Company Procedure – Fit for Work

APPENDIX: “DRIVER FATIGUE”

(Statement published by the Australian Road Research Board.)

Is driver fatigue a real problem?

Yes, several studies indicate that ‘driver asleep’ is a factor in about 25% of accidents on main highways. This kind of accident often results in death or severe injury.

What causes drivers to fall asleep?

There are several factors:

· A spell of 10 hours or more driving at the wheel. The risk of having an accident increases sharply if you drive for more than 10 hours.

· Long spells of driving on several days in a row. It becomes more likely that a driver will fall asleep as s/he extends into the third, fourth, fifth or later day of a period of driving duty.

· Older drivers, say, over 50, are more likely to fall asleep than younger drivers.

· Less than the usual amount of sleep makes a driver more likely to fall asleep at the wheel some time during the following day.

  • Consumption of alcohol – even in moderate amounts – increases the tendency to fall asleep.

Do stimulant drugs help?

Not very much and the benefit does not last long. Drugs do help to keep you from falling asleep, but they are no substitute for sleep. Relying on stimulants instead of sleep can be very dangerous. Driving sometimes becomes erratic when stimulants are taken and your chances of having an accident increase.

Does fatigue make people drive badly?

Yes, but not very badly. You may find that your driving is rough and unskilful but not actually dangerous. The real danger is falling asleep.

What can I do to keep awake?

NOTHING! Once you have begun to feel drowsy, it is time to stop. You can open the window and get lots of cool, fresh air, stop and have a walk around, turn up the radio – these will smarten you up for about 20 minutes. You will feel just as drowsy again soon afterwards.

What can I do?

  • Avoid the kind of driving conditions that the professional driver finds difficult and dangerous. This means:
  • Do not start a long trip at night after a day’s work; if you must do this, make sure you get to bed early the night before;
  • Not more than 10 hours on the road, unless you can share the driving with someone else;
  • Do not try to keep going after your first drowsy spell; the next will come quickly, and if you survive that, the next will come even more quickly.

Trip / Journey Plan

Equipment Check (√) (√)
Pre-start completed First aid kit
Spare wheel Radio
Jack Mobile phone
Wheel brace Water
Flashing light Oversize sign
Flags Fuel
Chains Dogs
Vehicle Registration Occupants

Journey

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………………………………………………………………………………………………………………See attached map

Accommodation

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Before travelling ensure that you inform your supervisor what time you will be leaving, where you are travelling to, the route you will be following and your estimated time of arrival. For trips which are longer than 4 hours you should check in via phone every 4 hours. On arrival immediately contact you supervisor again to let them know you have arrived safely. If you are travelling from one site to another site please inform both supervisors of your travel plans

Contact Details
Site Supervisor Name Phone Number Contacted (√)
Origin:
Destination:
  • Dee Samuel

    I AM HAPPY TO COME BY THIS GREAT RESEARCH WHICH IS ISO STANDARD. I WOULD LOVE TO HAVE MORE MATERIALS ON THIS IN OTHER TO ENABLE ME PERFORM MY TASK CREDITABLY.

  • Nna Oka

    Please as a follow up , i need your update on the Journey Management tool box meeting. That would assist me in managing the crew members and other passengers in my work place.
    Thanks

  • Bassey Friday Moses

    I must say this is a well researched document.I would want to get updates on this journey management plan and also materials on training for my heavy equipment operators.
    I must say the information contained here in is very educative.
    Regards

  • Nna Oka

    I want to give Kudos to the educators on this site. I am a journey Manager in one the Oil coys. I would want to have more of this update in your sobsequent publications.

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